Diagnostic Procedures

Laparoscopy

Diagnostic laparoscopy is a surgical procedure that doctors use to view a woman’s reproductive organs. A laparoscope, a thin viewing tube similar to a telescope, is passed through a small incision (cut) in the abdomen.

Colposcopy

A colposcopy is a non-surgical diagnostic tool performed with a colposcope. It’s used to further examine the cervix, vagina, and vulva when a woman has an abnormal Pap smear. If your gynecologist finds an area of unusual cells, she may take a sample and send it to the laboratory for testing.

Hysteroscopy

Hysteroscopy is a procedure that allows your doctor to look inside your uterus in order to diagnose and treat causes of abnormal bleeding. Hysteroscopy is done using a hysteroscope, a thin, lighted tube that is inserted into the vagina to examine the cervix and inside of the uterus.

Arthoscopy

Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure orthopaedic surgeons use to visualize, diagnose, and treat problems inside a joint.

Endoscope

An endoscope is an illuminated optical, typically slender and tubular instrument (a type of borescope) used to look deep into the body and used in procedures called an endoscopy

An endoscopy is used in medicine to look inside the body. The endoscopy procedure uses an endoscope to examine the interior of a hollow organ or cavity of the body.

Nasal Endoscope

The nasal endoscope is a medical device consisting of a thin, rigid tube with fiberoptic cables for bringing in light. The endoscope is then connected to a light source and a video camera to project magnified images on a screen.

Gastroendoscopy

Gastroendoscopy is the visualization of oesophagus (aka food pipe), stomach, upper part of duodenum through a Gastroendoscope.

Borescope

A borescope (occasionally called a boroscope, though this spelling is nonstandard) is an optical device consisting of a rigid or flexible tube with an eyepiece on one end, an objective lens on the other linked together by a relay optical system in between.

Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy or coloscopy is the endoscopic examination of the large bowel and the distal part of the small bowel with a CCD camera or a fiber optic camera on a flexible tube passed through the anus.

Angiogram

an X-ray photograph of blood or lymph vessels, made by angiography.

Types of angiograms

  • Computed Tomography Angiography.
  • Coronary Angiogram.
  • Digital Subtraction Angiography.
  • Magnetic Resonance Angiography.
  • Pulmonary Angiogram.
  • Radionuclide Angiogram.
  • Renal Angiogram.

X-rays

X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your body. The images show the parts of your body in different shades of black and white. This is because different tissues absorb different amounts of radiation.

Computerized Tomography (CT)

A computerized tomography (CT) scan combines a series of X-ray images taken from different angles and uses computer processing to create cross-sectional images, or slices, of the bones, blood vessels and soft tissues inside your body. CT scan images provide more detailed information than plain X-rays do

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Magnetic resonance imaging is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to form pictures of the anatomy and the physiological processes of the body in both health and disease.

Mammography

Mammography is the process of using low-energy X-rays to examine the human breast for diagnosis and screening.

Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine the severity of or treat a variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities within the body.

  • Positron Emission Tomography (Pet Scan)

Positron-emission tomography is a nuclear medicine functional imaging technique that is used to observe metabolic processes in the body as an aid to the diagnosis of disease.

  • Bone scan

A bone scan or bone scintigraphy is a nuclear medicine imaging technique of the bone. It can help diagnose a number of bone conditions, including; cancer of the bone or metastasis, location of bone inflammation and fractures, and bone infection.

  • Gallium scan

A gallium scan is a type of nuclear medicine test that uses either a gallium-67 or gallium-68 radiopharmaceutical to obtain images of a specific type of tissue, or disease state of tissue.

  • MIBG Scan

An MIBG Scan is a nuclear medicine scan which involves an injection of a liquid radioactive material called iodine-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine – MIBG for short. The radioactive material is injected into a vein on the front of your arm at the level of your elbow or in the back of your hand. A MIBG scan is commonly used for detection of neuroendocrine tumours such as neuroblastoma and phaeochromocytoma.

Electroencephalogram (EEG)

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test used to find problems related to electrical activity of the brain. An EEG tracks and records brain wave patterns. Small metal discs with thin wires (electrodes) are placed on the scalp, and then send signals to a computer to record the results.

Electromyography (EMG)

Electromyography (EMG) is an electrodiagnostic medicine technique for evaluating and recording the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles. EMG is performed using an instrument called an electromyograph to produce a record called an electromyogram.

Ultrasound Scan (USG)

An ultrasound scan is a medical test that uses high-frequency sound waves to capture live images from the inside of your body. It’s also known as sonography. The technology is similar to that used by sonar and radar, which help the military detect planes and ships.

Doppler Ultrasound

A Doppler ultrasound is a noninvasive test that can be used to estimate the blood flow through your blood vessels by bouncing high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound) off circulating red blood cells. A regular ultrasound uses sound waves to produce images, but can’t show blood flow.

Echocardiography

An echocardiogram, often referred to as a cardiac echo or simply an echo, is a sonogram of the heart. Echocardiography uses standard two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and Doppler ultrasound to create images of the heart

Cardiac Stress Test (TMT)

A cardiac stress test is a cardiological test that measures the heart’s ability to respond to external stress in a controlled clinical environment. The stress response is induced by exercise or by drug stimulation.

Electrocardiography (ECG or EKG)

Electrocardiography (ECG or EKG) is the process of recording the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time using electrodes placed on the skin.